Visit Films News


26 May 2010 // IN Our Movies

USA Today features Myth


Another great article on The Myth of The American Sleepover.

Click here to read the article




25 May 2010 // IN Our Movies

Visit Films finalizes deal with IFC for "Sorry Thanks"


IFC Films today announced the acquisition of two popular female-helmed titles from last year's SXSW Film Festival, Judith Krant's 'Made in China' and Dia Sokol's 'Sorry, Thanks.' The fish-out-of-water comedy 'China' won SXSW's Grand Jury Prize as well as the Chicken & Egg Award for Emerging Female Director. Relationship comedy 'Sorry' is Sokol's feature directorial debut, after producing the acclaimed 'Beeswax' and 'Nights and Weekends.' Both films will be released on VOD in June. IFC's Jeff Deutchman brokered both deals - with the Film Collaborative's Orly Ravid for 'China' deal, and with Visit Films' Ryan Kampe for 'Sorry.' [Basil Tsiokos]

Click here to read article on Indiewire




24 May 2010 // IN Market News

Cannes iPad raffle winner announced!




For the Cannes 2010 Marche du film, we decided to raffle off an iPad as a thank you to all of our buyers who we met with during the market. Today was the draw and the lucky winner is Carl Rickmers of Splendid Film of Germany. Congrats Carl!




21 May 2010 // IN Our Movies

'The Myth of the American Sleepover' filmmaker David Robert Mitchell Indiewire Interview


by Brian Brooks (Updated 5 hours, 25 minutes ago)

David Robert Mitchell made a tender and sweet coming-of-age story that has given the young writer/director some nice attention. His first feature, 'The Myth of the American Sleepover', had its world debut at the SXSW Film Festival in March where it received a special jury prize for Best Ensemble Cast, and has made its way to Cannes this week, screening in Critics Week.

Not unlike 'Sleepover,' Mitchell is a charming and engaging person who's pursued a particular aesthetic and feel for his film, which was about eight years in the making. And like most filmmakers getting their start, he took chances. The result was one of the more innovative teen dramas in recent memory.

'I definitely felt a certain amount of weight in wanting to do a good job,' Mitchell told indieWIRE on a sunny afternoon at the American Pavilion in Cannes this week. 'There were a lot of things I wanted to accomplish with it and going into production was frightening, but I decided I had to just focus on the things I had control over. I wrote the script and I believed in it and I kept faithful to the story.'

'The Myth of the American Sleepover' follows four young people on the last night of summer. The teens, all played by first-time actors, cross paths one long night as they seek out love and adventure.

Mitchell sought out 'real kids with screen presence' to fill the roles, most of them hailing from the suburban Detroit neighborhood where he grew up, and he developed the story via a combination of his own experiences and his own creative input.

'I wanted the audience to see these characters and not recognize them from elsewhere - just see them as people,' Mitchell said. 'I thought people who don't have a lot of experience [with acting] would bring something more natural to it… We wanted to find people who were a little bit different than what youd find in a Hollywood film.' The tone and feel of 'Sleepover' is reminiscent of teen dramas before that heyday of high school films in the '80s as embodied by John Hughes, though Mitchell said that those classics do mean a lot to him.

'I used the spine of 'American Graffiti' to tell a story that is a bit more gentle, natural and intimate,' Mitchell observed. 'There are small moments that may not seem important but are actually very important. Sitting with a girl on the slide and wanting to kiss her. Inching a bit closer to someone. Hanging out on a summer evening with your friends in the backyard. There are the bigger moments too, of course, but there are also those quiet and gentle moments that are important.'

After finishing undergrad in Michigan, Mitchell decided to enroll in Florida State's graduate film program after he decided to go into filmmaking - something he said he had wanted to do since junior high school. He had also started making shorts a few years later in high school.

'I had this deep desire to be surrounded by people who wanted to make movies as much as I did. I wanted something really intense. It's everything to me.'

While at Florida State, he was already formulating the idea for 'Sleepover' in addition to other projects. After completing his program in 2002, he moved to Los Angeles along with some classmates who ended up working on the film with him. He's currently working on a script about a boy pursuing a girl that he says is 'tonally similar to 'Sleepover," in addition to a story about an L.A. woman in her 20s, which he described as a 'simple character story.' 'I also have other stories from when I was younger that I'd like to go back to, but maybe not right away,' he said.

'I like horror films and science fiction, but at the core, what I want to do are [stories] like 'Sleepover.' Maybe not always about teenagers, but something that is honest, personal and gentle at its core.'




15 May 2010 // IN Our Movies

The Myth of the American Sleepover Screen Daily Review




Dir: David Robert Mitchell. US. 2009. 93mins


Few US indie films since Michael Lehmann's Heathers (1988) have shown the originality of The Myth of the American Sleepover, David Robert Mitchell's poignant debut feature. Unlike Heathers, it's not satirical, and the director does not adhere to the conventional linear story arc, with alternating high and low dramatic points.

The movie has the potential to catch on with both younger and older audiences, the latter finding the truth of teen angst and delight in their memory banks.

Mitchell loosely structures the film like interlocked concentric circles (he has said his idea of narrative is more European than American), which pivot on four high school and college age teens in a cocooned suburban milieu who pass through what might seem like minor ups and downs to an adult viewer, but in fact are major to the youths, caught as they are between the conflicting urges of sex, belonging, and achieving.

Though lacking recognisable names, the actors deliver excellent and credible performances — an achievement recognised when The Myth won Best Ensemble at the South by Southwest festival, where it had its world premiere in March. It screens in Critics Week in Cannes.

Coupled with Mitchell's confident, stylish but unobtrusive direction, the movie has the potential to catch on with both younger and older audiences, the latter finding the truth of teen angst and delight in their memory banks. It should do well for an American independent film in foreign territories, especially in English-language markets, infatuated as many foreigners are with stateside suburbia. Once it finds a distributor, and with the help of critics, it should find a decent audience in the home market.

The action takes place at the end of summer, just before the school year begins. Several sleepovers are held, mostly in students' homes, and, except for some unexpected visits — some welcome, some not — are segregated by gender. Pretty Maggie (Sloma, the discovery here and a strong candidate for future stardom), younger than most and therefore of low rank in the hierarchy based on school level, is one of the only students to pass on the overnights.

She is preoccupied with flirting with Steven, a cynical poolboy (Diedrich), biking with her friend Beth (DeNoyer), and dancing, both in a school marching group and, in party mode before it gets rained out.

Handsome Rob (Morton) attends the 'guy' sleepover, but he is too obsessed with a pretty blonde he eyed that afternoon at the supermarket to enjoy himself. As self-absorbed as most teens are, he is completely oblivious to the crush his friend Marcus (McCallum) has on him. Attractive Claudia (Bauer) is the newcomer, invited at the last minute to the cool girls' sleepover, who discovers the jealousy and spite not only of the others (she has a sexy boyfriend) but also within herself.

The fourth principal character is Scott (Jacobsen), a college junior who returns to the safety of this world, in part to recover some sort of relationship he had several years before with a set of twins, Ady and Anna Abbey (Nikita and Jade Ramsey), who enjoy teasing him. Not without its good moments, this section is the weakest of the four, perhaps because Scott is so removed from this insular universe that the viewer is pulled out of it. Altogether, though, the back-and-forth cutting between the youngsters is excellent — not surprising, since Mitchell is an experienced editor.


Production company: Roman Spring Pictures
International sale: Visit Films, +1 718 312-8210
Executive producer: Michael Ferris Gibson
Producer: Adele Romanski
Screenplay: David Robert Mitchell
Cinematography: James Laxton
Editor: Julio C. Perez IV
Production designer: Jeanine A. Nicholas
Music: Kyle Newmaster
Main cast: Claire Sloma, Marlon Morton, Amanda Bauer, Brett Jacobsen, Nikita Ramsey, Jade Ramsey, Annette DeNoyer, Wyatt McCallum, Mary Wardell, Doug Diedrich, Dane Jones

Click here to see this review on the Screen Daily site




12 May 2010 // IN Our Movies

'Little Dizzle' review in the New York Times - Finding Meaning in Cleaning'


'The Immaculate Conception of Little Dizzle' is like 'Clerks' reimagined by William S. Burroughs. Looking as if it were devised on acid and executed on mushrooms, this imaginative debut feature from the Seattle artist and filmmaker David Russo finds meaning in cleaning and life in dead ends.

Read more...




12 May 2010 // IN Market News

Visit to sell Critics Week entry The Myth Of The American Sleepover


New York-based Visit Films has acquired international rights to Cannes Critics Week selection The Myth Of The American Sleepover.

The film premiered at the SXSW film festival where it won the Jury Award and was written and directed by David Robert Mitchell.

Set in the hinterland of Metro-Detroit, the story follows four young people as they search for love and adventure on the last night of summer. Adele Romanski produced.

Read more

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